Architecture of Wellbeing

Time: 15:25 - 15:45

Date: Tuesday 16 October

20181016 15:25 20181016 15:45 Europe/London Architecture of Wellbeing

A recent report by the Institute for Public Policy Research published a paper in September 2017 stating that over the last 5 years there has been a fivefold increase in the proportion of students who disclose a mental health condition to their university. The pressures of academic standards, financial cost and social pressures are adding… Read more »

Education Estates 2019

Synopsis

A recent report by the Institute for Public Policy Research published a paper in September 2017 stating that over the last 5 years there has been a fivefold increase in the proportion of students who disclose a mental health condition to their university. The pressures of academic standards, financial cost and social pressures are adding to the risk of poor mental health and wellbeing in higher education.

In England approximately 1 in 3 women and 1 in 10 men between 16-24 years olds say they have experienced a mental health condition. This is more likely to occur in undergraduate courses and particularly in the first year of university. Universities are therefore being encouraged by the government to make wellbeing a strategic priority. A fundamental part of this is the impact that the build environment has on the human experience.

Vitruvius defined the elements of a well-designed building as firmness, commodity and delight, critically linking good design with happiness and wellbeing. Now this has been redefined as:
Connectivity – the importance of social spaces
Activity – encouraging physical activity
Mindfulness – diversity of space and importance of landscaping
Learning – considering the physical environment, and how this encourages interaction and dialogue.
Giving – encouraging student to engage with a wider community

The talk will explore these issues in more detail and look at examples of how they can be addressed through the built environment.

Speakers

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