Childrens’ Perspectives on Primary School Environments

Time: 14:45 - 15:05

Date: Tuesday 16 October

20181016 14:45 20181016 15:05 Europe/London Childrens’ Perspectives on Primary School Environments

In the UK during the 2000s, there was significant investment in the Building Schools for the Future programme, with a desire to achieve high quality inspirational environments that enhance learning. However, a change in government in 2010 led to the existing school building programmes at the time being axed and the Priority School Building Programme… Read more »

Education Estates 2019

Synopsis

In the UK during the 2000s, there was significant investment in the Building Schools for the Future programme, with a desire to achieve high quality inspirational environments that enhance learning. However, a change in government in 2010 led to the existing school building programmes at the time being axed and the Priority School Building Programme being introduced in 2011, with baseline design guidelines and the aim to make school construction more cost-effective. Considering the wide range of new school buildings now existing in the UK, this posed the question: what impact do new school buildings have on the users and their experiences in these environments?

This presentation will present findings from PhD research undertaken 2013-2017. The research reviews the current situation by investigating the impact of ‘new’ primary school buildings on children’s experiences and their daily lives at school, conducting a qualitative post-occupancy investigation of four case study schools. The research also highlights the potential of participatory techniques through use of creative methods, providing an understanding of primary school buildings through the children’s eyes, giving them a voice within the research. The findings identify that, from the children’s perspective, new primary schools are to some extent, providing sufficient spaces in which to learn. However, it remains that there are some environmental issues which are affecting children. The importance of the holistic school environment is raised as well as desirable spaces and places for children at school, with an emphasis on outdoor spaces and the natural environment. By providing insights into their daily experiences, the findings suggest that such spaces ought to be considered higher priority in the design process.

Speakers

  • Lois Woods Course Leader in Architecture - Nottingham Trent University

« Back