SEN and Alternative Provision

Time: 12:00 - 12:25

Date: Wednesday 17 October

20181017 12:00 20181017 12:25 Europe/London SEN and Alternative Provision

The Market Issue: There is an increasing demand for high quality, innovative and specialist school places for pupils with Special Educational Needs (SEN) and those who require Alternative Provision. The latest figures from the Department for Education show an increase in the number of pupils with identified special educational needs – 1.2m pupils in January… Read more »

Education Estates 2019

Synopsis

The Market Issue:
There is an increasing demand for high quality, innovative and specialist school places for pupils with Special Educational Needs (SEN) and those who require Alternative Provision.
The latest figures from the Department for Education show an increase in the number of pupils with identified special educational needs – 1.2m pupils in January 2017, and a year on year increase since 2010, in the number of pupils with a statement or EHC plan attending maintained special schools – now 43.8%.
In the sphere of Alternative Provision, in a recent NFER survey, 84% of school leaders said there are insufficient specialist places in alternative provision for pupils with mental health needs, while 74% report there are insufficient places for pupils with behavioural issues. This survey also highlighted issues with quality of provision and poor outcomes for pupils in many alternative provision settings, with only 1% of young people in alternative provision achieving 5 good GCSE passes.
The Department for Education is working with Local Authorities and other Proposer Groups, through the Free Schools Programme, to establish new Special and Alternative Provision Schools, however future projections show an anticipated requirement for 13,000 additional places between 2017-2026, which equates to a requirement for around 130 new schools. This capacity is not currently being created, meaning that more children with complex needs will be placed in mainstream schools.
Targeted investment in the estates of academies and maintained schools will be required to enable school leaders to develop effective and inclusive provision, particularly for children with the most common types of primary need: Autistic Spectrum Condition, Speech, Language and Communication Needs and Social and Emotional Mental Health, in order to create better outcomes for all.
Our presentation will cover:
How to develop school estates to manage pupils with AP and SEN effectively in a mainstream context. We will share our experience of developing award-winning SEN and AP schools, and creating provision within mainstream settings nationwide. We will advise on the advantages and disadvantages of different options, and how to engage with stakeholders to ensure successful outcomes.

Speakers

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